Keeping Consistent and Meeting the Needs of Knitters.

8ply hand-spun wool in cakes
One of the big favours we spinners perform for the world is linking knitters with farmers.

Knitters are a good bunch usually but they CAN get preoccupied with what their yarn should look and feel like. Too many rely totally on mill-spun yarn blends and do not consider what the raw product actually looks like. I am finding fewer and fewer can confidently substitute a different yarn to work the pattern they are wanting to use. This concerns me because it is exactly the hold the yarn companies want over knitters.....and for a long time that meant women.

My rule for being skilled in something is.....

-when you know what to do when it goes wrong.

My other rule for confidence is.............

-when you see the possibilities of a project appear before you even with only 2/3 of the necessary materials in front of you.

My rule for being in control is............

-when you know what will work because you did the two things above and you really enjoyed it.
A local fleece spun as a 4ply.
When working with raw fleeces and spinning them up for spinners I find that I am asked 2 questions:

                1. What ply is it? (actually the question usually comes out as "What kind of                            wool is it?....I mean what type of wool....I mean is it Double Knit or Single?)

                2. Is it scratchy?

I then have some common ground to cover because they aren't quite ready to "come over to my side". 

My answer to this constant defensiveness (which it is) is to work harder to meet their understandings. 

What the knitters were wanting was wool like they used already -in a consistent 4ply or 8ply density. They also wanted labels and a contact number. This I have done from the outset but hey.....

The biggest thing to get knitters to listen was to produce patterns that "spoke" to them.

Basic Beanie Pattern


Consistent production of singles and plies is something I take particular pride in. I use a wee tool to help as a guide...



After you have got your head around the maths....and it IS worth it -you can check for consistency.

Please understand that you are now in the world of "Wraps Per Inch". Personally, I keep a sample of the yarn single I want at hand and check it throughout the day.

I also recommend this diagram for consideration...



There are any number of charts and guides on yarn densities available on-line. Often they are written for Imperial measurements and are popular with the US markets. When dealing with Ravelry it's one of those details you need to include with any pattern published.



The study of yarn construction becomes important when you are back dealing with customers who are used to mill-spun wool. The fact that you have taken the time and trouble to learn and be confident with the numbers puts you in better shape.


Skeined, plied wool.
I won't discuss the "Is it scratchy?" question here. That's for another time.

Tin Shed Yarns

Fiona MacBride




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